Thursday, July 8

What's in a (nick)name?

I read a blog post from Instead of the Dishes last week, was was surprised to see my own site mentioned. She was talking about the use of nicknames in blogs, and wasn't sure if Ladybug was what I'd really called my child. I guess with MoonUnit Zappa and Audio Science Clayton, and Kal-El Coppola Cage, anything goes nowadays when naming your spawn.

I have a passle of family-related sites filling up my RSS feed (the "mommy blogger" moniker is starting to wear on my nerves, and I have more than one daddy blogger on my list), among authors and literary agents and "frugalistas" (another new pet peeve... the "-ista") and cooking blogs.

Several of the blogs that mention children use nicknames for the short people, and some even have nicknames for their spouses. Others have their full names, and the names of their kiddos, right there in the open for any pedophile or identity thief or random neighborhood peeping-tom to find.
(Does that give you an inkling of why my kids go by aliases here?)


Actually, my kids go by several names here, and on my Twitter, and also in real life.
Because all of their names begin with the letter B (which was cute when we had only two Bees, but then when the third B surprised us, we couldn't bear to leave her out of the B tradition, so we found yet another suitable B name. Even though I still think 3-of-a-kind is a little corny. Duggars we are not.), my kids often go by their rank, agewise.


B1
B1 is most often The Boy, but is also known as Pooter.
His nickname is kinda self-evident. When he was just a few days old, he would wake himself up from naps by tooting. Big, long, loud, fog-hornlike man toots. So, I christened him Pooter, and as he grew in receptive and expressive language, it became interchangable with his given name.
Except, only his daddy and I are allowed to call him that. Not his sisters, not his Menga (my mother), not his Nana or Granny or cousins. I don't know when that law was passed, but it stands to this day.
The only other nickname he's been given was by his Aunt Kris, before she passed away. His middle name starts with W, and Aunt Kris called him BW or B-Dub almost all the time. He doesn't remember much about her, and The Girl was only 9 months old when Aunt Kris died, but the one thing The Boy loves and remembers is that his Aunt Kris gave him his own shiny new name.
Pooter's sisters call him Bubby. His name is not complicated, but it's hard for a toddler to pronounce. When his first sister was learning to talk, she jumbled his name something awful, so we just settled on Bubby. Because my husband would croak if he had a "Bubba" living in his house. We're Arkansan, but we're not hillbilly.


B2
B2 is The Girl, but also answers to Ladybug.
In fact, she answers to Ladybug, Sissy, Sis, 'Bug, and Beegle-bug, which is how she first pronounced Ladybug.
Well, she also goes by Princess (from her daddy, natch), Sweet Face (from me), and one cousin used to call her Broccoli, which, the way he said it, kind of rhymed with her real name.
I was the one who first called her Ladybug. When we brought her home from the hospital and I changed bucketloads of breastfed-baby poo, I was shocked every time I opened a diaper and found baby lady bits. It was like I couldn't even believe she was a girl, after two years of being sprinkled by her brother's man parts. So, every time I laid her on the changing table, I'd say, "Hello, lady" to her little furious self. I figured she was too young to be called a lady, so I added the -bug part. And it stuck.
Plus, she had reeeeally cute dragonfly, butterfly, and ladybug bedding.
Now we're trying to teach her to dress and act with modesty and tact and decorum, because that's "what Ladies do," as opposed to Trashy Girls. She makes it known that she "is a Lady!.... BUG!" We're working on it.


B3
B3 is The Baby, but more often than not in real life, she is The Bunny. She has no big nickname backstory. I did some digging around on my old blog just now, and found that on August 20, 2008, exactly four months before she was born, I bestowed her nickname upon her. This is what I posted that day:

It fits, and actually, I can dig up a lot of history of bunnies in our family:

Jeremy's first gift to The Girl was a white Precious Moments bunny that says "Now I lay me down to sleep...."

The Boy's crib sheet, comforter and bumper pads featured the Nutbrown Hares from "Guess How Much I Love You"

My very own Momma called me Thumper when I was in her belly.

 
So, from the time she was a'thumpin in my tummy, she was not just any bunny, but The Bunny. Occasionally I call her by delicious food names: Punkin' Bread, Muffinhead, Peaches, Porkchop... the list really goes on. But mostly, she's The Bunny.
 



And my husband, well, he's nicknameless. When I met him, everyone called him by his last name, which is a good, strong, manly kind of last name, but which will not be mentioned on the interwebs. I suppose I could call him The Marine, or The Lawnmower Man, or The Super Awesome Fantastic Husband and Father... but while those are all true, they are also weird, or kind of long. So, just like I'm Savannah B, he is Jeremy B.
 
 
 
Do you use nicknames for your kids/spouse/friends/family, or do you just let it all hang out online, Social Security number and all?
 
 
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9 comments:

  1. I tend to let it all hang out. My facebook page is my full name, as well as my twitter and even my blog. BUT, I don't have a family to protect, just me. And since I am aware of what I'm doing, I think it's OK.
    The information is out there. Everything is 'out there' in one form or another so I just try to make sure all of it is correct.
    If I had a 'family,' I'm sure I would have a different approach. I tried to go anonymous for a while on my blog, but it got too complicated. What to talk about, what to leave out. So I have it all out.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I use real names for the most part, although I call my husband E to avoid the Evan/Evan confusion. When I started blogging I did so "anonymously" but as more and more real life friends became readers I felt it wasn't worth the effort. I try not to put my full name on my blog but I think all my names are out there at various points.

    I've read several articles about perceived internet privacy vs. actual internet privacy and the bottom line seems to be if you are on the internet in almost any way your info is no longer private (see current Facebook scandal). I also wish I could find the report on internet predators vs. neighborhood pedophiles, because it said blog-stalking is their LEAST favorite way to find kids. There are plenty of poorly supervised kids at playgrounds, malls and parks without tracking them down online. ACTUAL online predators are a totally different topic, and something I'll worry about many many years from now when Baby Evan is old enough to use the computer.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Since the kids I talk about aren't my own, I don't feel like it's my place to put their names out in public, so on Twitter and my blog, kids get nicknames. (Facebook not as much since I have it set to fairly high privacy levels... whatever that's worth right now... and the parents are usually on there too) As for grown ups on my blog, if they are immediate family or a close friend who knows they are going to end up in my blog, I generally use their name. It kind of varies depending on the person and the story I'm telling. If they are another blogger / tweep, I use whatever name they use to identify themselves. I try not to "out" their real name.

    I'm just kind of protective of names anyway. I guess it's the cop's daughter then cop's wife in me. I don't like to see personalized license plates or a kid's name stuck on the back glass of Mom's car. If someone did want to get their attention for a sinister purpose, it's really easy to see the sticker on the car and yell "Hey, Johnny..." and just that quick, they have the kid's attention. (Same applies to adults with license plates, names on shirts, etc.) Maybe that's overly paranoid, but... better safe than sorry, I figure.

    But own name - nah, I don't care. I use it. Whatever.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Government Funding / Research Scandal

    Visit the website that the Canadian House of Commons and numerous Universities across North America have as well.
    ---------------------------------------------
    It's an ingenious form of white collar crime:

    PHD credentials / contacts, an expendable family, participation of a dubious core of established professionals, Unaudited Government agency funding GamblingResearch.org ), identity protected by Privacy Commissioner Office of Canada, (Jennifer Stoddart), unlimited funding (under the guise of research grants), PHD individuals linked with the patient (deter liability issues), patient diagnosed with mental illness (hospital committed events = no legal lawyer access/rights), cooperation of local University and police (resources and security); note the Director of Brock Campus Security.

    This all adds up to a personal ATM; at the expense of Canadian Taxpayers!
    -------------------
    "convinced" to be taken to St. Catharines General hospital (2001) and conveniently diagnosed with a "mental illness" (hint: Hallucination type; "forced" to consume "prescribed"
    corresponding medication for "cognitive" purposes )
    -------------------
    **The Psych convinces the patients fragmented family, 70 yr old mother, 10 yr old nephew and his divorced sister (who rented across the incredibly beautiful home of Marianne Edwards ( ex-Brock instructor ) and her husband (lawyer)), to move in together. They comply and obey to the "Doctor's" credentials, contacts, and financial gifts.
    -------------------
    "Where" and "How" have the participants been receiving their (lavish?) incomes from the past 8 years? Government Agencies like Click here: www.gamblingresearch.org (annual
    grants up to 500 k ) ?
    The link above takes you directly to one of their research teams. Lisa Root, ironically, met with me during the 2001 incident as a C.A.M.H. employee, who I was "encouraged" to meet.
    -------------------
    Google

    Medicine Gone Bad

    or

    http://medicine-gone-bad.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  5. Well, shoot. All our real names are out there, mostly because I couldn't remember to consistently use a nickname.

    Mother of the year...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks for the link-back. As you know, I'm naming names over on my blog. Mostly because my blog was originally born as a place for me to practice and (maybe someday) showcase my writing, so I don't want to be anonymous. Sometimes my writing mentions my kids, and as previous comments said, I just didn't stop and take the time to come up with blog aliases.

    I also agree with Suzanne's comment - I'm not overly concerned about keeping things anonymous. I'm pretty sure my social is not on my blog, though.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is late, but I just use first names. I'm not super concerned with being anonymous, but because I often write about political issues and don't want that to ever keep me from getting a job, I try to keep that stuff from being easily Google-able with my name. I'd change my Twitter to my real name, but too many people know me as Ernie Bufflo at this point.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I use real names for the most part, although I call my husband E to avoid the Evan/Evan confusion. When I started blogging I did so "anonymously" but as more and more real life friends became readers I felt it wasn't worth the effort. I try not to put my full name on my blog but I think all my names are out there at various points.

    I've read several articles about perceived internet privacy vs. actual internet privacy and the bottom line seems to be if you are on the internet in almost any way your info is no longer private (see current Facebook scandal). I also wish I could find the report on internet predators vs. neighborhood pedophiles, because it said blog-stalking is their LEAST favorite way to find kids. There are plenty of poorly supervised kids at playgrounds, malls and parks without tracking them down online. ACTUAL online predators are a totally different topic, and something I'll worry about many many years from now when Baby Evan is old enough to use the computer.

    ReplyDelete

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